Renewable Energy Technology Innovation Accelerates the Energy Transition

Jakarta, 15 June 2024 – Energy transition is a process of changing the energy system that requires more than one phase and must involve various actors. The energy transition will also have a number of socio-economic impacts for residents in areas or provinces whose economies are supported by the mining sector or fossil industry.

Currently, apart from ensuring that the energy system changes to a low-emission energy system, parties such as civil society organizations are also pressing for a just transition process. One aspect of a just transition is ensuring that various impacts and changes from the energy system transition process are managed well so that they do not have a negative impact on the community.

Deon Arinaldo, Energy Transformation Program Manager of the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) in his presentation at the National Seminar forum “The Role of Universities in Overseeing a Just Energy Transition Process in Indonesia” organized by Jayabaya University, explained that Indonesia is a country whose energy needs will continue to grow, it is important to immediately transition to renewable energy to also reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, especially from the electricity sector.

“Researchers have found that there is a large technical potential for renewable energy such as solar and wind in Indonesia. So, the question now is no longer whether or not renewable energy can meet our needs, but how this technical potential can rapidly be deployed into power generation,” said Deon.

Deon also said that it was important for Indonesia to start building a renewable energy component industry such as solar panels and other components domestically to gain maximum benefits from the energy transition process.

“It is good if we choose certain sectors where we (abundantly) have the resources and in the future, these will become commodities that are needed out there. This strategy was chosen by China when 20 years ago they started developing electric vehicle batteries, and now they are starting to reap the benefits,” added Deon.

Seizing the 1.5 Degree Climate Target with A More Comprehensive Strategy

Jakarta, 4 June 2024 – Indonesia stole the world’s attention when it received Just Energy Transition Partnership funding from IPG countries at the end of 2022. Indonesia is facing challenges in its energy transition process, one of which is because the composition of Indonesia’s energy sources is dominated by fossil energy up to 60-70 percent. The large fossil energy mix reflects other factors such as a large fossil energy infrastructure. Under these conditions, formulating a plan towards zero emissions requires a comprehensive approach so that the costs required for the transition can be reduced and energy system reliability and energy affordability can be maintained.

The Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) and the Center for Global Sustainability of the University of Maryland are reviewing Indonesia’s energy situation, and testing scenarios to bring Indonesia in line with the Paris climate target, namely limiting the increase in earth’s temperature to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

Fabby Tumiwa, Executive Director of IESR at the launch of the report “Coal Electric Power Transition Pathways in Line with the 1.5 ℃ Target in Indonesia” on Tuesday, June 4th 2024, explained that this report covers on grid and off grid CFPPs by implementing several strategies to reduce operating capacity (flexible operation), early retirement, biomass cofiring, renewable energy substitution, construction cancellation, electricity grid connection, and carbon capture storage technology.

“This study provides a bottom-up strategy for reducing coal CFPPs based on the characteristics of existing CFPPs. “This road map is complementary to the JETP plan,” said Fabby.

Nathan Hultman, Director of the Center for Global Sustainability, University of Maryland explained the challenges faced by Indonesia as a coal producing and consuming country.

“Indonesia’s challenges are unique, there is an opportunity to push climate action that will bring other co-benefits such as (green) job growth, improved air and water quality, and protection of natural resources,” he said.

Maria Borrero, Research Associate of the University of Maryland, author of the report “Coal Electric Power Transition Pathways in Line with the 1.5 ℃ Target in Indonesia” said that JETP Indonesia’s CIPP (Comprehensive Investment and Policy Plan) document shows a more ambitious target. Unfortunately, it is not yet align with the 1.5 target. To bring it into line with the Paris climate target of 1.5℃ a more comprehensive plan is needed.

“One of the striking factors of the Indonesian energy system is the existence of quite a large number of captive CFPPs and currently their capacity reaches around 15 GW. “In the next few years there will be an additional of 6 GW currently under construction,” said Maria.

The age of captive CFPPs, which are still quite young (most captives were built after 2016), is also a challenge in itself because the infrastructure still has a long technical lifespan. Maria added that to execute the JETP target there are a number of uncertainties, such as uncertainty about funding fulfillment and uncertainty about methods for ensuring emission reductions.

Akbar Bagaskara, IESR power system analyst, explained that the current condition of Indonesia’s electricity system is that it is expected that Indonesia’s basic generation costs will fall by 21% in 2030 and 75% in 2050.

“Greater integration of variable renewable energy requires the deployment of storage technologies, expanded and improved grid infrastructure, and stable and flexible unit operations,” he said.

Joseph Pangalila, Deputy President Director of Cirebon Power, during the panel discussion session, appreciated this study. This could be a good initiative in efforts to accelerate the energy transition.

“I hope that this study can be followed up until implementation. I personally want to see what technology can substitute coal,” said Joseph.

Arionmaro Asi Simaremare, Energy Transition Manager at PT PLN, added that growing captive capacity outside Java requires inertia.

“One way to eliminate the need for captives is to move to using renewable energy or you can switch to decarbonization by instead of just supplying coal, you can mix it with local renewable energy (gas, solar, wind) so that the captive process can be further reduced. use of coal,” he said.

Workshop and Capacity Building for Media Phase 2


Recording Phase 2


Background

Indonesia, the world’s largest archipelago, is faced with two major crises: climate change and the energy crisis. The impact of climate change is increasingly felt with the increasing frequency of natural disasters, such as floods, landslides and droughts. On the other hand, the energy crisis is characterized by a high dependence on fossil fuels that are depleting and not environmentally friendly.

An energy transition towards renewable energy or clean energy is the solution to overcome both crises. Renewable energy such as solar, wind and water have great potential to meet Indonesia’s energy needs, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the impacts of climate change.

Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) and the media have an important role in encouraging the government to achieve clean energy targets in Indonesia. CSOs can act as agents of advocacy, education, and community mobilization to support clean energy. Although CSOs have an important role, there are still capacity gaps in understanding and communicating energy transition issues. Meanwhile, mass media can act as agents of education and persuasion to support clean energy. Although the mass media has an important role, there is still a capacity gap in understanding and communicating energy transition issues, especially in local mass media. This is due to the complexity of energy transition issues that require in-depth knowledge and understanding. Moreover, there are many differences of opinion and challenges on new renewable energy (NRE) as a solution for clean energy sources in the future.

To achieve the impact of CSO pressure on government policies in line with the Net Zero Emission (NZE) target in 2060 or sooner, it is important to increase CSO capacity so that advocacy and information dissemination are more targeted. To that end, IESR created a capacity building program designed to increase the capacity of CSOs in understanding and communicating energy transition issues in Indonesia.

The capacity building program is expected to benefit CSOs in improving their ability to promote energy transition through advocacy, education, and community mobilization. This capacity building program is an important step to improve the capacity of CSOs in supporting the energy transition in Indonesia. By increasing the capacity of CSOs, it is expected that the energy transition in Indonesia can be implemented more effectively and sustainably.

Prior to the capacity building program, IESR has conducted an in-depth analysis of the condition of mass media coverage in Indonesia and conducted mass media mapping. These results were used to create a capacity building concept that adapts to the needs. Needs that IESR considers important enough to be followed up will be selected as the basis for the capacity building concept.

The capacity building program will be held in two phases in 2024. In the workshop that will be held at the end of May 2024 (stage 1), climate change, the introduction of energy transition, and also the energy transition roadmap in Indonesia will be presented. Regarding climate change, it will be presented how the condition of Indonesia with current government policies will impact the NZE target. It will also explain how Indonesia’s environmental conditions and the effect of carbon emissions on climate change are occurring. The introduction to energy transition is given with material that is already structured and relevant to current conditions. The general public can access it freely and learn about the energy transition more easily. As well as the energy transition roadmap that needs joint commitment so that the NZE target can be achieved. Phase 2 will discuss more technical issues such as solar and wind power generation technologies as well as nuclear and CSS technologies. This phase will be conducted at the end of June or sooner.

About Climate Action Tracker (CAT)

The Climate Action Tracker (CAT) is an independent scientific analysis that assesses a country’s climate action and measures its conformity with the Paris Agreement to pursue efforts to limit global temperature rise to 1.5oC.

CAT is the product of a consortium of two organizations, Climate Analytics and New Climate Institute, in collaboration with several other institutions. CAT has been providing its independent analysis to policymakers since 2009.

In 2022, the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) officially joined as a collaborator in CAT. IESR provides assessments of other countries’ mitigation targets, policies and actions and reviews Climate Analytics’ assessments of Indonesia’s mitigation targets, policies and actions.

About the Energy Transition Academy

The Energy Transition Academy by transisienergi.id is a digital learning portal on energy transition. The materials provided in this program are reliable and up to date sources. Also relevant to Indonesia’s current conditions.

The Energy Transition Academy is an educational solution for students, civil society organizations, journalists to deepen their understanding of energy transformation in Indonesia and the world. In addition, the Energy Transition Academy also targets and develops skill building, so that the younger generation can contribute and be active in the energy transition process.

Objective

  1. Providing knowledge related to energy transition issues and renewable energy in Indonesia
  2. Understand the complexity of energy transition issues that occur
  3. Can identify and analyze energy transition policies
  4. Develop effective advocacy and communication strategies
  5. Build a common perception among mass media in the field of climate change or renewable energy in encouraging the energy transition
  6. Build networks and cooperation with various parties

Presentasi

Workshop Nuclear and CCS – Pintoko Aji & Raditra Wiranegara

Workshop-Nuclear-and-CCS-Pintoko-Aji-Raditra-Wiranegara

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Pensiun Dini PLTU – Raditya Wiranegara

Pensiun-Dini-PLTU-Workshop-Media-Raditya-Wiranegara

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Pengantar PLTS dan PLTB – Alvin Putra & Pintoko Aji

Pengantar-PLTS-dan-PLTB-Alvin-Putra-Pintoko-Aji

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Workshop and Capacity Building for Media Phase 1


Recording Tahap 1


Background

Indonesia, the world’s largest archipelago, is faced with two major crises: climate change and the energy crisis. The impact of climate change is increasingly felt with the increasing frequency of natural disasters, such as floods, landslides and droughts. On the other hand, the energy crisis is characterized by a high dependence on fossil fuels that are depleting and not environmentally friendly.

An energy transition towards renewable energy or clean energy is the solution to overcome both crises. Renewable energy such as solar, wind and water have great potential to meet Indonesia’s energy needs, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the impacts of climate change.

Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) and the media have an important role in encouraging the government to achieve clean energy targets in Indonesia. CSOs can act as agents of advocacy, education, and community mobilization to support clean energy. Although CSOs have an important role, there are still capacity gaps in understanding and communicating energy transition issues. Meanwhile, mass media can act as agents of education and persuasion to support clean energy. Although the mass media has an important role, there is still a capacity gap in understanding and communicating energy transition issues, especially in local mass media. This is due to the complexity of energy transition issues that require in-depth knowledge and understanding. Moreover, there are many differences of opinion and challenges on new renewable energy (NRE) as a solution for clean energy sources in the future.

To achieve the impact of CSO pressure on government policies in line with the Net Zero Emission (NZE) target in 2060 or sooner, it is important to increase CSO capacity so that advocacy and information dissemination are more targeted. To that end, IESR created a capacity building program designed to increase the capacity of CSOs in understanding and communicating energy transition issues in Indonesia.

The capacity building program is expected to benefit CSOs in improving their ability to promote energy transition through advocacy, education, and community mobilization. This capacity building program is an important step to improve the capacity of CSOs in supporting the energy transition in Indonesia. By increasing the capacity of CSOs, it is expected that the energy transition in Indonesia can be implemented more effectively and sustainably.

Prior to the capacity building program, IESR has conducted an in-depth analysis of the condition of mass media coverage in Indonesia and conducted mass media mapping. These results were used to create a capacity building concept that adapts to the needs. Needs that IESR considers important enough to be followed up will be selected as the basis for the capacity building concept.

The capacity building program will be held in two phases in 2024. In the workshop that will be held at the end of May 2024 (stage 1), climate change, the introduction of energy transition, and also the energy transition roadmap in Indonesia will be presented. Regarding climate change, it will be presented how the condition of Indonesia with current government policies will impact the NZE target. It will also explain how Indonesia’s environmental conditions and the effect of carbon emissions on climate change are occurring. The introduction to energy transition is given with material that is already structured and relevant to current conditions. The general public can access it freely and learn about the energy transition more easily. As well as the energy transition roadmap that needs joint commitment so that the NZE target can be achieved. Phase 2 will discuss more technical issues such as solar and wind power generation technologies as well as nuclear and CSS technologies. This phase will be conducted at the end of June or sooner.

About Climate Action Tracker (CAT)

The Climate Action Tracker (CAT) is an independent scientific analysis that assesses a country’s climate action and measures its conformity with the Paris Agreement to pursue efforts to limit global temperature rise to 1.5oC.

CAT is the product of a consortium of two organizations, Climate Analytics and New Climate Institute, in collaboration with several other institutions. CAT has been providing its independent analysis to policymakers since 2009.

In 2022, the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) officially joined as a collaborator in CAT. IESR provides assessments of other countries’ mitigation targets, policies and actions and reviews Climate Analytics’ assessments of Indonesia’s mitigation targets, policies and actions.

About the Energy Transition Academy

The Energy Transition Academy by transisienergi.id is a digital learning portal on energy transition. The materials provided in this program are reliable and up to date sources. Also relevant to Indonesia’s current conditions.

The Energy Transition Academy is an educational solution for students, civil society organizations, journalists to deepen their understanding of energy transformation in Indonesia and the world. In addition, the Energy Transition Academy also targets and develops skill building, so that the younger generation can contribute and be active in the energy transition process.

Objective

  1. Providing knowledge related to energy transition issues and renewable energy in Indonesia
  2. Understand the complexity of energy transition issues that occur
  3. Can identify and analyze energy transition policies
  4. Develop effective advocacy and communication strategies
  5. Build a common perception among mass media in the field of climate change or renewable energy in encouraging the energy transition
  6. Build networks and cooperation with various parties

 


Presentation

CAT Indonesia Assessment – Delima Ramadhani

1.-CAT-Indonesia-Assessment-Media-Delima-Ramadhani

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Introduction to Energy Transition- Abraham Octama

2.-Pengenalan-Transisi-Energi-Abraham-Octama

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Indonesia Energy Transition Roadmap – Raditya Wiranegara

3.-Peta-Jalan-Transisi-Energi-Indonesia-Raditya-Wiranegara

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Workshop and Capacity Building for Civil Society Organizations (CSO) Phase 1


Recording Tahap 1


Background

Indonesia, the world’s largest archipelago, is faced with two major crises: climate change and the energy crisis. The impact of climate change is increasingly felt with the increasing frequency of natural disasters, such as floods, landslides and droughts. On the other hand, the energy crisis is characterized by a high dependence on fossil fuels that are depleting and not environmentally friendly.

An energy transition towards renewable energy or clean energy is the solution to overcome both crises. Renewable energy such as solar, wind and water have great potential to meet Indonesia’s energy needs, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the impacts of climate change.

Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) and the media have an important role in encouraging the government to achieve clean energy targets in Indonesia. CSOs can act as agents of advocacy, education, and community mobilization to support clean energy. Although CSOs have an important role, there are still capacity gaps in understanding and communicating energy transition issues. Meanwhile, mass media can act as agents of education and persuasion to support clean energy. Although the mass media has an important role, there is still a capacity gap in understanding and communicating energy transition issues, especially in local mass media. This is due to the complexity of energy transition issues that require in-depth knowledge and understanding. Moreover, there are many differences of opinion and challenges on new renewable energy (NRE) as a solution for clean energy sources in the future.

To achieve the impact of CSO pressure on government policies in line with the Net Zero Emission (NZE) target in 2060 or sooner, it is important to increase CSO capacity so that advocacy and information dissemination are more targeted. To that end, IESR created a capacity building program designed to increase the capacity of CSOs in understanding and communicating energy transition issues in Indonesia.

The capacity building program is expected to benefit CSOs in improving their ability to promote energy transition through advocacy, education, and community mobilization. This capacity building program is an important step to improve the capacity of CSOs in supporting the energy transition in Indonesia. By increasing the capacity of CSOs, it is expected that the energy transition in Indonesia can be implemented more effectively and sustainably.

Prior to the capacity building program, IESR has conducted an in-depth analysis of the condition of mass media coverage in Indonesia and conducted mass media mapping. These results were used to create a capacity building concept that adapts to the needs. Needs that IESR considers important enough to be followed up will be selected as the basis for the capacity building concept.

The capacity building program will be held in two phases in 2024. In the workshop that will be held at the end of May 2024 (stage 1), climate change, the introduction of energy transition, and also the energy transition roadmap in Indonesia will be presented. Regarding climate change, it will be presented how the condition of Indonesia with current government policies will impact the NZE target. It will also explain how Indonesia’s environmental conditions and the effect of carbon emissions on climate change are occurring. The introduction to energy transition is given with material that is already structured and relevant to current conditions. The general public can access it freely and learn about the energy transition more easily. As well as the energy transition roadmap that needs joint commitment so that the NZE target can be achieved. Phase 2 will discuss more technical issues such as solar and wind power generation technologies as well as nuclear and CSS technologies. This phase will be conducted at the end of June or sooner.

About Climate Action Tracker (CAT)

The Climate Action Tracker (CAT) is an independent scientific analysis that assesses a country’s climate action and measures its conformity with the Paris Agreement to pursue efforts to limit global temperature rise to 1.5oC.

CAT is the product of a consortium of two organizations, Climate Analytics and New Climate Institute, in collaboration with several other institutions. CAT has been providing its independent analysis to policymakers since 2009.

In 2022, the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) officially joined as a collaborator in CAT. IESR provides assessments of other countries’ mitigation targets, policies and actions and reviews Climate Analytics’ assessments of Indonesia’s mitigation targets, policies and actions.

About the Energy Transition Academy

The Energy Transition Academy by transisienergi.id is a digital learning portal on energy transition. The materials provided in this program are reliable and up to date sources. Also relevant to Indonesia’s current conditions.

The Energy Transition Academy is an educational solution for students, civil society organizations, journalists to deepen their understanding of energy transformation in Indonesia and the world. In addition, the Energy Transition Academy also targets and develops skill building, so that the younger generation can contribute and be active in the energy transition process.

Objective

  1. Providing knowledge related to energy transition issues and renewable energy in Indonesia
  2. Understand the complexity of energy transition issues that occur
  3. Can identify and analyze energy transition policies
  4. Develop effective advocacy and communication strategies
  5. Build a common perception among mass media in the field of climate change or renewable energy in encouraging the energy transition
  6. Build networks and cooperation with various parties

 


Presentation

CAT Indonesia Assessment – Shahnaz Nur Firdausi

4.-CSO-Indonesia-Assessment-CSO-Shahnaz

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Introduction to Energy Transition- Abraham Octama

2.-Pengenalan-Transisi-Energi-Abraham-Octama

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Indonesia Energy Transition Roadmap – Raditya Wiranegara

3.-Peta-Jalan-Transisi-Energi-Indonesia-Raditya-Wiranegara

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Road to Youth Climate Conference Webinar: Children, Youth and Climate Change

Background

The impacts of climate change have become a serious threat to the lives of children and youth. A study conducted by Save the Children in 2020 found that children born in 2020 experienced disasters 3.4 times more often than their grandparents born in 1960. The disasters involved climate change such as heatwaves, droughts, forest fires, floods and crop failures, putting additional pressure on the environment necessary for children’s growth and protection. Another study conducted by UNICEF highlighted that climate change is the biggest threat to children’s health, nutrition, education and future.

Given the devastating impact of the climate crisis on the lives of children and young people, IESR together with Yayasan Madani Berkelanjutan, Wahana Visi Indonesia, Yayasan Indonesia Cerah, and Save the Children Indonesia, will organize the Youth Climate Conference – a youth conference on climate change. The event will be held in June, 2024. To ensure meaningful participation of children and young people in this event as well as to promote the upcoming Youth Climate Conference agenda plan, we are inviting several environmental volunteer organizations/communities initiated by or consisting of children and young people. The participation of children and young people in this agenda is expected to also become a momentum to bring together the aspirations of children and young people on climate change issues and concrete actions to tackle climate change. In addition, this event is also expected to be a medium for socializing the upcoming Youth Climate Conference.

Objectives

  • Discuss the impacts of climate change on children, youth, women and indigenous peoples.
  • To discuss the role of children and youth in mitigating the negative impacts of climate change.
  • To promote the Youth Climate Conference to the public, especially children and youth.

Making the Global Stocktaking Process More Relevant to Southeast Asia

Jakarta, 25 April 2024 – Global efforts to halt climate change by reducing emissions are entering a phase of global consolidation. Since 2023, the Independent Global Stocktake (iGST), a consortium of civil society actors gathered to support the first Global Stocktake in order to assess the progress of the Paris Agreement (2015).

In a webinar entitled Navigating the Outcomes of the First Global Stocktake in Southeast Asia, Arief Rosadi, Climate Diplomacy Coordinator of the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) stated that the results of the first GST had not had much influence on the energy transition process in the Southeast Asia region.

“The most important thing about this GST process is that it must be able to be translated into more ambitious climate policies. Energy transition is the low hanging fruit for Southeast Asia, increasing renewable energy targets and climate ambitions will not only contribute to reducing emissions but provide a positive signal to encourage transformation towards a low carbon economy in the region,” said Arief.

Arief emphasized that efforts to double energy efficiency and triple renewable by 2030 (Double Down,Triple Up Initiative) are crucial stages for encouraging the energy transition in the Southeast Asia region. He also added that the next two year period is a crucial moment for Southeast Asia considering that ASEAN is currently preparing ASEAN Post Vision 2025 and the latest APAEC (ASEAN Plan of Action on Energy Cooperation) energy policy document. The first GST point regarding doubling and tripling of renewable energy efficiency needs to be reflected in both documents.

At the planning, implementation and policy evaluation levels, the role of experts or independent research institutions is important to provide alternative views and input for policy makers. It is necessary to ensure that there is meaningful participation by all parties involved and potentially affected by the policy.

Danize Lukban, climate policy analyst at the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities (ICSC), reminded the importance of (climate) policies based on scientific data in this transition process.

“In the policy planning process (iGST derivative), the role of climate experts and institutions conducting research is crucial to provide alternative views and input for policy makers,” she said.

ASEAN as a consolidated body of countries in Southeast Asia is expected to become a consolidation forum for its member countries to produce more ambitious and collaborative climate action within the scope of the Southeast Asia region.

Road to Youth Climate Conference Webinar: Climate Change, Industry and Lifestyle


Tayangan Tunda


Background

The impacts of climate change have become a serious threat to the lives of children and youth. A study conducted by Save the Children in 2020 found that children born in 2020 experienced disasters 3.4 times more frequently than their grandparents born in 1960. The disasters involved climate change, such as heatwaves, droughts, forest fires, floods, and crop failures, putting additional pressure on the environment necessary for children’s growth and protection. Another study conducted by UNICEF highlighted that climate change is the biggest threat to children’s health, nutrition, education, and future.

On the other hand, the development of the industrial sector in recent decades has changed people’s lifestyles in many ways. From electronic goods to daily clothing. Unfortunately, environmentally unsound production and consumption activities often have adverse impacts on climate change. For example, the overuse of natural resources, deforestation due to industrial activities, and the development of fast fashion trends that encourage unsustainable consumption. In fact, the industrial sector alone accounts for 25% of global carbon emissions (UNEP, 2023). Therefore, it is necessary to make changes in mindset and daily behavior, especially for the younger generation, to reduce and mitigate the impact of climate change on the industrial sector and lifestyle.

This webinar aims to dig deeper into how climate change is caused by industry and the lifestyles of the general public, including those of young people. Through in-depth discussions, a better understanding of the challenges and opportunities faced by young people in the context of climate change is expected. In addition, this webinar is also geared towards formulating solutions and concrete actions that can be taken by young people in building sustainable lifestyles and formulating innovations in industry to reduce negative impacts on the environment.

Objective

  • Discuss the impact of climate change on the industrial and lifestyle sectors.
  • Discuss the role of young people in mitigating the impacts of climate change on their lifestyle.

Presentasi

 

Peran Anak Muda dalam Mendorong Arah Perkembangan Industri Indonesia yang Berkelanjutan – Faricha Hidayati

Peran-Anak-Muda-dalam-Mendorong-Arah-Perkembangan-Industri-Indonesia-yang-Berkelanjutan-Faricha-Hidayati

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Half-hearted Indonesian Climate Policy and Action

Jakarta, 30 January 2024 – The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has declared 2023 as the hottest year. Historical records show that the earth’s temperature continues to increase from year to year. To keep the earth’s temperature rise to no more than 1.5 degrees, experts have recommended ensuring the world reaches peak global emissions in 2030 and must fall in the following years.

The use of fossil energy is one of the largest contributors to emissions in the world. Executive Director of the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR), Fabby Tumiwa, said that Indonesia needs measurable and real action for transitioning away from fossil energy.

“Based on the Climate Action Tracker (CAT) assessment, Indonesia has not shown a reduction in emissions, in fact it will experience an increase in emissions in 2022 and one of the causes is an increase in coal consumption used for down streaming. Indonesia’s rating even dropped from ‘highly insufficient’ to ‘critically insufficient’. The most important thing is real steps to accelerate the transition in this decade,” emphasized Fabby.

Indonesia, as one of the top 10 emitting countries in the world, actually received a bad record with Indonesia’s climate ranking dropping to the lowest level according to the Climate Action Tracker (CAT) assessment framework.

Delima Ramadhani, IESR Climate Policy Project Coordinator, said at the launch of the Climate Action Tracker report that throughout 2023, Indonesia has delivered a number of initiatives and policies that normatively support the acceleration of the energy transition, but this does not have implications for efforts to reduce emissions.

“Indonesia’s rating dropped from ‘highly insufficient’ to ‘critically insufficient’. ‘Critically insufficient’ means that if countries have climate commitments like Indonesia, the rate of global warming will be at the level of 4 degrees,” said Delima.

Mustaba Ari Suryoko, Intermediate Policy Analyst, Coordinator of the Aneka EBT Program Preparation Working Group, responded that the assessment of emissions reduction efforts is a reminder for all parties to continue working to achieve emissions reduction targets.

“Achievement number figures are an accumulation of various variables, so we hope that in planning we will not only determine ambitious targets but also make efforts to achieve them,” he said.

Anna Amalia, Functional Intermediate Planner at the Ministry of National Development Planning (Bappenas), said that to pursue Indonesia’s more ambitious climate targets there are several opportunities.

“The government is starting to move progressively, in the next 20 years we will have a RPJP (National Long Term Development Plan-ed) which focuses on reducing GHG emissions, how we encourage economic growth through low emission corridors and of course other policies will follow,” Anna said.

The annual Climate Transparency report also includes an Implementation Check Report to see the effectiveness of climate policy implementation.

Akbar Bagaskara, IESR’s Power Sector Analyst, explained that Indonesia’s electricity sector is in the medium category because the implementation of policies that support the transition in the electricity sector has not been effective.

“Historically, in the last five years we never achieved our annual renewable energy target. We need to strengthen policies to strengthen Indonesia’s renewable energy enabling environment, as well as involving various groups in the planning, procurement and evaluation processes,” explained Akbar.

Yosi Amelia, Forest & Climate Program Officer, Yayasan Madani Berkelanjutan, highlighted the lack of synchronization of strategies across ministries and government agencies which created unclear documents that should be treated as guidelines.

“There are inconsistencies between documents, for example regarding Indonesia’s deforestation quota. In the FOLU Net Sink 2030 strategy, there are no longer deforestation quotas, while the E-NDC still provides deforestation quotas,” said Yosi.