Workshop and Capacity Building for Media Phase 1

Background

Indonesia, the world’s largest archipelago, is faced with two major crises: climate change and the energy crisis. The impact of climate change is increasingly felt with the increasing frequency of natural disasters, such as floods, landslides and droughts. On the other hand, the energy crisis is characterized by a high dependence on fossil fuels that are depleting and not environmentally friendly.

An energy transition towards renewable energy or clean energy is the solution to overcome both crises. Renewable energy such as solar, wind and water have great potential to meet Indonesia’s energy needs, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the impacts of climate change.

Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) and the media have an important role in encouraging the government to achieve clean energy targets in Indonesia. CSOs can act as agents of advocacy, education, and community mobilization to support clean energy. Although CSOs have an important role, there are still capacity gaps in understanding and communicating energy transition issues. Meanwhile, mass media can act as agents of education and persuasion to support clean energy. Although the mass media has an important role, there is still a capacity gap in understanding and communicating energy transition issues, especially in local mass media. This is due to the complexity of energy transition issues that require in-depth knowledge and understanding. Moreover, there are many differences of opinion and challenges on new renewable energy (NRE) as a solution for clean energy sources in the future.

To achieve the impact of CSO pressure on government policies in line with the Net Zero Emission (NZE) target in 2060 or sooner, it is important to increase CSO capacity so that advocacy and information dissemination are more targeted. To that end, IESR created a capacity building program designed to increase the capacity of CSOs in understanding and communicating energy transition issues in Indonesia.

The capacity building program is expected to benefit CSOs in improving their ability to promote energy transition through advocacy, education, and community mobilization. This capacity building program is an important step to improve the capacity of CSOs in supporting the energy transition in Indonesia. By increasing the capacity of CSOs, it is expected that the energy transition in Indonesia can be implemented more effectively and sustainably.

Prior to the capacity building program, IESR has conducted an in-depth analysis of the condition of mass media coverage in Indonesia and conducted mass media mapping. These results were used to create a capacity building concept that adapts to the needs. Needs that IESR considers important enough to be followed up will be selected as the basis for the capacity building concept.

The capacity building program will be held in two phases in 2024. In the workshop that will be held at the end of May 2024 (stage 1), climate change, the introduction of energy transition, and also the energy transition roadmap in Indonesia will be presented. Regarding climate change, it will be presented how the condition of Indonesia with current government policies will impact the NZE target. It will also explain how Indonesia’s environmental conditions and the effect of carbon emissions on climate change are occurring. The introduction to energy transition is given with material that is already structured and relevant to current conditions. The general public can access it freely and learn about the energy transition more easily. As well as the energy transition roadmap that needs joint commitment so that the NZE target can be achieved. Phase 2 will discuss more technical issues such as solar and wind power generation technologies as well as nuclear and CSS technologies. This phase will be conducted at the end of June or sooner.

About Climate Action Tracker (CAT)

The Climate Action Tracker (CAT) is an independent scientific analysis that assesses a country’s climate action and measures its conformity with the Paris Agreement to pursue efforts to limit global temperature rise to 1.5oC.

CAT is the product of a consortium of two organizations, Climate Analytics and New Climate Institute, in collaboration with several other institutions. CAT has been providing its independent analysis to policymakers since 2009.

In 2022, the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) officially joined as a collaborator in CAT. IESR provides assessments of other countries’ mitigation targets, policies and actions and reviews Climate Analytics’ assessments of Indonesia’s mitigation targets, policies and actions.

About the Energy Transition Academy

The Energy Transition Academy by transisienergi.id is a digital learning portal on energy transition. The materials provided in this program are reliable and up to date sources. Also relevant to Indonesia’s current conditions.

The Energy Transition Academy is an educational solution for students, civil society organizations, journalists to deepen their understanding of energy transformation in Indonesia and the world. In addition, the Energy Transition Academy also targets and develops skill building, so that the younger generation can contribute and be active in the energy transition process.

Objective

  1. Providing knowledge related to energy transition issues and renewable energy in Indonesia
  2. Understand the complexity of energy transition issues that occur
  3. Can identify and analyze energy transition policies
  4. Develop effective advocacy and communication strategies
  5. Build a common perception among mass media in the field of climate change or renewable energy in encouraging the energy transition
  6. Build networks and cooperation with various parties

Workshop and Capacity Building for Civil Society Organizations (CSO) Phase 1

Background

Indonesia, the world’s largest archipelago, is faced with two major crises: climate change and the energy crisis. The impact of climate change is increasingly felt with the increasing frequency of natural disasters, such as floods, landslides and droughts. On the other hand, the energy crisis is characterized by a high dependence on fossil fuels that are depleting and not environmentally friendly.

An energy transition towards renewable energy or clean energy is the solution to overcome both crises. Renewable energy such as solar, wind and water have great potential to meet Indonesia’s energy needs, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the impacts of climate change.

Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) and the media have an important role in encouraging the government to achieve clean energy targets in Indonesia. CSOs can act as agents of advocacy, education, and community mobilization to support clean energy. Although CSOs have an important role, there are still capacity gaps in understanding and communicating energy transition issues. Meanwhile, mass media can act as agents of education and persuasion to support clean energy. Although the mass media has an important role, there is still a capacity gap in understanding and communicating energy transition issues, especially in local mass media. This is due to the complexity of energy transition issues that require in-depth knowledge and understanding. Moreover, there are many differences of opinion and challenges on new renewable energy (NRE) as a solution for clean energy sources in the future.

To achieve the impact of CSO pressure on government policies in line with the Net Zero Emission (NZE) target in 2060 or sooner, it is important to increase CSO capacity so that advocacy and information dissemination are more targeted. To that end, IESR created a capacity building program designed to increase the capacity of CSOs in understanding and communicating energy transition issues in Indonesia.

The capacity building program is expected to benefit CSOs in improving their ability to promote energy transition through advocacy, education, and community mobilization. This capacity building program is an important step to improve the capacity of CSOs in supporting the energy transition in Indonesia. By increasing the capacity of CSOs, it is expected that the energy transition in Indonesia can be implemented more effectively and sustainably.

Prior to the capacity building program, IESR has conducted an in-depth analysis of the condition of mass media coverage in Indonesia and conducted mass media mapping. These results were used to create a capacity building concept that adapts to the needs. Needs that IESR considers important enough to be followed up will be selected as the basis for the capacity building concept.

The capacity building program will be held in two phases in 2024. In the workshop that will be held at the end of May 2024 (stage 1), climate change, the introduction of energy transition, and also the energy transition roadmap in Indonesia will be presented. Regarding climate change, it will be presented how the condition of Indonesia with current government policies will impact the NZE target. It will also explain how Indonesia’s environmental conditions and the effect of carbon emissions on climate change are occurring. The introduction to energy transition is given with material that is already structured and relevant to current conditions. The general public can access it freely and learn about the energy transition more easily. As well as the energy transition roadmap that needs joint commitment so that the NZE target can be achieved. Phase 2 will discuss more technical issues such as solar and wind power generation technologies as well as nuclear and CSS technologies. This phase will be conducted at the end of June or sooner.

About Climate Action Tracker (CAT)

The Climate Action Tracker (CAT) is an independent scientific analysis that assesses a country’s climate action and measures its conformity with the Paris Agreement to pursue efforts to limit global temperature rise to 1.5oC.

CAT is the product of a consortium of two organizations, Climate Analytics and New Climate Institute, in collaboration with several other institutions. CAT has been providing its independent analysis to policymakers since 2009.

In 2022, the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) officially joined as a collaborator in CAT. IESR provides assessments of other countries’ mitigation targets, policies and actions and reviews Climate Analytics’ assessments of Indonesia’s mitigation targets, policies and actions.

About the Energy Transition Academy

The Energy Transition Academy by transisienergi.id is a digital learning portal on energy transition. The materials provided in this program are reliable and up to date sources. Also relevant to Indonesia’s current conditions.

The Energy Transition Academy is an educational solution for students, civil society organizations, journalists to deepen their understanding of energy transformation in Indonesia and the world. In addition, the Energy Transition Academy also targets and develops skill building, so that the younger generation can contribute and be active in the energy transition process.

Objective

  1. Providing knowledge related to energy transition issues and renewable energy in Indonesia
  2. Understand the complexity of energy transition issues that occur
  3. Can identify and analyze energy transition policies
  4. Develop effective advocacy and communication strategies
  5. Build a common perception among mass media in the field of climate change or renewable energy in encouraging the energy transition
  6. Build networks and cooperation with various parties

Between Low Renewable Energy Target and High Economic Growth Ambitions

Jakarta, 20 February 2024 – Fabby Tumiwa, Executive Director of the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) assesses the steps taken by the National Energy Council (DEN) to adjust the renewable energy mix target in the Draft of Government Regulation on National Energy Policy (RPP KEN)  from the original 23 percent to 17-19 percent 2030 is a backward step because it is not in line with the stated goal of reducing emissions and achieving Indonesia’s net-zero emissions target by 2060 or sooner.

Fabby also highlighted the energy transition agenda carried by each pair of presidential candidates in the 2024 election, which includes a number of renewable energy mix targets until 2030 in an interview with the Squawk Box program.

According to him, each candidate has an energy transition agenda, one of which is the desire to pursue the same renewable energy mix target as the current National Energy Policy, ranging from 27-30 percent by 2030. Apart from that, each candidate also has a commitment to limit the operation of coal power plants.

“For candidate number 02, what is clearly visible is the increase in the use of biofuel to replace or reduce fuel subsidies as stated during the campaign,” said Fabby. They (presidential and vice-presidential candidates’ number two) are targeting a biofuel blend percentage of 50 percent by 2029, as well as ethanol utilization of 10-20 percent.

Furthermore, Fabby emphasized that for the electricity sector, the aim of ending coal plant operations early must be accompanied by adding a larger portion of renewable energy. Apart from replacing the electrical power that was initially supplied by coal-fired power plants, renewable energy generation must also meet the projected electricity growth needs in the future. Moreover, Indonesia has the ambition to pursue economic growth of up to, for example, 6-7 percent, so electricity demand is projected to grow even greater.

“Based on IESR’s calculations, to achieve these various targets, the renewable energy mix in 2030 must reach 40 percent, this is somewhat different from the target adjustments made by DEN currently,” explained Fabby.

Fabby added that the new government’s homework related to the energy sector will be to accelerate the development of renewable energy, especially in the electricity and liquid fuel sub-sectors.

Preparing for the Energy Transition in South Sumatra for Youth

Palembang, 5 December 2023 – The increasing intensity of hydrometeorological disasters in the last decade indicates that climate change is currently underway. Secretary General of the United Nations (UN), Antonio Guterres, said that the earth is entering an era of global boiling, where July 2023 was recorded as the hottest day in history.

Climate change occurs due to high greenhouse gas emissions. The energy sector is one of the highest emitters, especially with the use of fossil energy such as coal. Indonesia is one of the coal producing countries, with 80% of its coal output for export needs. Indonesian coal production is concentrated in four provinces in Indonesia, namely East Kalimantan, South Kalimantan, North Kalimantan and South Sumatra. South Sumatra is a food and energy barn for the island of Sumatra. The coal produced by South Sumatra will be used to generate electricity which will supply all the electricity needs on the island of Sumatra, according to projections, it will even export electricity as far as Singapore.

Marlistya Citraningrum, Sustainable Energy Access Program Manager of the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR), in a public lecture at Sriwijaya University quoted a survey related to the current climate change phenomenon, young people aged 24-39 years had high concerns about the climate crisis and impact.

“The energy transition is a systematic effort to mitigate the impact of the climate crisis that we are increasingly feeling,” said Marlistya Citraningrum, who is familiarly known as Citra.

This change in the energy system also has other impacts, namely the growing need for workers who have skills and insight into sustainability.

However, young people’s enthusiasm for getting involved in green jobs is hampered by several things, one of which is the limited information about green jobs and job vacancies in the green jobs sector.

“In the energy transition process, young people can take roles according to their respective skills, not limited to the engineering field alone. Social departments such as economics and international relations can also contribute to the energy transition process,” said Citra.

Citra added that currently a number of challenges still face the development of green jobs in Indonesia, one of which is related to certification. Currently, certification is still limited to technical sectors related to renewable energy-based electricity generation.

On the other hand, reducing and stopping the use of coal and switching to renewable energy will have an impact on social and economic aspects in coal-producing regions in Indonesia. Hari Wibawa, Head of the Economic and Development Funding Division of South Sumatra Bappeda, on the same occasion, said that coal reserves in South Sumatra province will run out in 12 years, so economic diversification is very important to avoid major economic shocks when the coal sector stops.

“Our (government’s) current priority is to integrate the energy transition plan into the RPJPD so that every action or activity has a strong legal basis,” said Hari.

IETO 2024: Indonesia Needs to Build Momentum to Reach Peak Energy Sector Emissions in 2030

Jakarta, December 12, 2023 – Indonesia aims to reach peak greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2035 and gradually move towards net zero emission (NZE) by 2060 or earlier. The energy sector in Indonesia is currently a major source of emissions, with nearly 90.4 percent of the country’s domestic energy supply coming from fossil fuels. Therefore, the transition to renewable energy is crucial in reducing emissions.

Unfortunately, the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) observed that the trend of renewable energy development tends to slow down, reaching only 0.97 GW of the 3.4 GW target in the fourth quarter of 2023. This slow progress will make it difficult for Indonesia to reduce its emissions and meet the decarbonization target in the power sector. Moreover, with rapidly increasing emissions from the demand sector, Indonesia is at risk of not reaching its peak emissions. Therefore, it is crucial to have high emission reduction ambition and strong political commitment to achieve the target.

The discussion of Indonesia’s efforts to reach peak emissions in 2030, which has the potential to be a milestone in the transformation to renewable energy on a large scale or to end hopes of achieving the NZE target sooner, is the main topic in IESR’s flagship report entitled Indonesia Energy Transition Outlook (IETO) 2024.

The Executive Director of IESR, Fabby Tumiwa, stated that this year’s IETO 2024 is more comprehensive in monitoring Indonesia’s energy transition development and projection. Tumiwa mentioned that Indonesia has already released a plan.

The IETO 2024 report states that for Indonesia to meet the emission target of 250 MtCO2e/y by 2030, as agreed upon in the Just Energy Transition Partnership (JETP), it must reduce its coal and diesel power plants by 4.29 GW by 2030. Furthermore, Indonesia needs to increase its renewable energy development by at least 30.5 GW by 2030 to achieve this goal.

Pintoko Aji, Renewable Energy Analyst of IESR, said that the high penetration of variable renewable energy (solar and wind power) will make the concept of baseload plants or plants that operate continuously with high capacity irrelevant.

“To incorporate more variable renewable energy (VRE), Indonesia’s electricity system requires a flexible and responsive infrastructure. This means that the power system must be able to adapt to fluctuating loads and respond to the variability of electricity production from VRE sources. To achieve this, it is necessary to thoroughly review contractual restrictions, such as legal contract modifications from take-or-pay to take-and-pay, and to implement flexibility incentives.,” said Pintoko Aji.

IESR encourages the government to show stronger political will and concrete steps to accelerate renewable energy penetration. In addition, the decarbonization strategy must be implemented across all sectors to support each other. IESR believes that the new president who will be elected in the 2024 election must create momentum for the energy transition from the beginning of his leadership.

All discussions on the status and analysis of the energy sector to accelerate the energy transition are summarized in the Indonesia Energy Transition Outlook (IETO) 2024 and published since 2017 with the Indonesia Clean Energy Outlook (ICEO), which then transformed into IETO in 2019.

“In addition to summarizing the course of Indonesia’s energy transition over the past year, this IETO comprehensively projects sectoral policies in each energy sector and contrasts them with long-term targets. This can be an input for policymakers and stakeholders in the electricity, transportation, industry, and building sectors to improve their sectoral emission mitigation targets and implementation levels,” explained Deon Arinaldo, Program Manager of Energy Transformation, IESR.

 

IESR will host the Indonesia Energy Transition Outlook 2024 report launch on December 15, 2023. Don’t miss the chance to register and participate in this momentous event. Visit s.id/IETO2024 to secure your spot today.

Kontan | Here’s The Description of the Cirebon 1 CFPP Transaction will be Completed in the First Semester of 2024

The Cirebon 1 Coal Fired Power Plant (CFPP) will have its operational life shortened by seven years, and it is now expected to operate only until December 2035 instead of July 2042. The project has secured funding commitments from the Energy Transition Mechanism (ETM) scheme, and the transaction is expected to be finalized in the first half of 2024.

Read more on Kontan.