Workshop and Capacity Building for Media Phase 2


Recording Phase 2


Background

Indonesia, the world’s largest archipelago, is faced with two major crises: climate change and the energy crisis. The impact of climate change is increasingly felt with the increasing frequency of natural disasters, such as floods, landslides and droughts. On the other hand, the energy crisis is characterized by a high dependence on fossil fuels that are depleting and not environmentally friendly.

An energy transition towards renewable energy or clean energy is the solution to overcome both crises. Renewable energy such as solar, wind and water have great potential to meet Indonesia’s energy needs, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the impacts of climate change.

Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) and the media have an important role in encouraging the government to achieve clean energy targets in Indonesia. CSOs can act as agents of advocacy, education, and community mobilization to support clean energy. Although CSOs have an important role, there are still capacity gaps in understanding and communicating energy transition issues. Meanwhile, mass media can act as agents of education and persuasion to support clean energy. Although the mass media has an important role, there is still a capacity gap in understanding and communicating energy transition issues, especially in local mass media. This is due to the complexity of energy transition issues that require in-depth knowledge and understanding. Moreover, there are many differences of opinion and challenges on new renewable energy (NRE) as a solution for clean energy sources in the future.

To achieve the impact of CSO pressure on government policies in line with the Net Zero Emission (NZE) target in 2060 or sooner, it is important to increase CSO capacity so that advocacy and information dissemination are more targeted. To that end, IESR created a capacity building program designed to increase the capacity of CSOs in understanding and communicating energy transition issues in Indonesia.

The capacity building program is expected to benefit CSOs in improving their ability to promote energy transition through advocacy, education, and community mobilization. This capacity building program is an important step to improve the capacity of CSOs in supporting the energy transition in Indonesia. By increasing the capacity of CSOs, it is expected that the energy transition in Indonesia can be implemented more effectively and sustainably.

Prior to the capacity building program, IESR has conducted an in-depth analysis of the condition of mass media coverage in Indonesia and conducted mass media mapping. These results were used to create a capacity building concept that adapts to the needs. Needs that IESR considers important enough to be followed up will be selected as the basis for the capacity building concept.

The capacity building program will be held in two phases in 2024. In the workshop that will be held at the end of May 2024 (stage 1), climate change, the introduction of energy transition, and also the energy transition roadmap in Indonesia will be presented. Regarding climate change, it will be presented how the condition of Indonesia with current government policies will impact the NZE target. It will also explain how Indonesia’s environmental conditions and the effect of carbon emissions on climate change are occurring. The introduction to energy transition is given with material that is already structured and relevant to current conditions. The general public can access it freely and learn about the energy transition more easily. As well as the energy transition roadmap that needs joint commitment so that the NZE target can be achieved. Phase 2 will discuss more technical issues such as solar and wind power generation technologies as well as nuclear and CSS technologies. This phase will be conducted at the end of June or sooner.

About Climate Action Tracker (CAT)

The Climate Action Tracker (CAT) is an independent scientific analysis that assesses a country’s climate action and measures its conformity with the Paris Agreement to pursue efforts to limit global temperature rise to 1.5oC.

CAT is the product of a consortium of two organizations, Climate Analytics and New Climate Institute, in collaboration with several other institutions. CAT has been providing its independent analysis to policymakers since 2009.

In 2022, the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) officially joined as a collaborator in CAT. IESR provides assessments of other countries’ mitigation targets, policies and actions and reviews Climate Analytics’ assessments of Indonesia’s mitigation targets, policies and actions.

About the Energy Transition Academy

The Energy Transition Academy by transisienergi.id is a digital learning portal on energy transition. The materials provided in this program are reliable and up to date sources. Also relevant to Indonesia’s current conditions.

The Energy Transition Academy is an educational solution for students, civil society organizations, journalists to deepen their understanding of energy transformation in Indonesia and the world. In addition, the Energy Transition Academy also targets and develops skill building, so that the younger generation can contribute and be active in the energy transition process.

Objective

  1. Providing knowledge related to energy transition issues and renewable energy in Indonesia
  2. Understand the complexity of energy transition issues that occur
  3. Can identify and analyze energy transition policies
  4. Develop effective advocacy and communication strategies
  5. Build a common perception among mass media in the field of climate change or renewable energy in encouraging the energy transition
  6. Build networks and cooperation with various parties

Presentasi

Workshop Nuclear and CCS – Pintoko Aji & Raditra Wiranegara

Workshop-Nuclear-and-CCS-Pintoko-Aji-Raditra-Wiranegara

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Pensiun Dini PLTU – Raditya Wiranegara

Pensiun-Dini-PLTU-Workshop-Media-Raditya-Wiranegara

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Pengantar PLTS dan PLTB – Alvin Putra & Pintoko Aji

Pengantar-PLTS-dan-PLTB-Alvin-Putra-Pintoko-Aji

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Anticipating Fossil Energy Stranded Assets

Jakarta, May 31, 2024 – In the face of the climate crisis, the world is increasingly advocating for using renewable energy and pushing for reducing fossil fuel development and usage, particularly coal-fired power plants, which are significant contributors to carbon emissions. As a result, stakeholders must be prepared for the possibility of stranded assets in the fossil fuel industry.

When transitioning to renewable energy, it’s essential to anticipate the risk of stranded assets related to fossil energy. Farid Wijaya, Senior Analyst at the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR), explains that stranded assets can include buildings, equipment, machinery, transportation and logistics, and industrial activities that rely on fossil fuels.

“In Indonesia, almost 85 percent of stalled assets are estimated to be upstream processes of the fossil fuel exploration industry. Some of the factors that can cause stalled assets include new government regulations that limit the use of fossil fuels, such as carbon pricing, increases and fluctuations in fossil fuels due to geopolitics and supply reserves, as well as changes in demand for shifting to renewable energy due to lower energy costs,” said Farid Wijaya at the Sustainable Energy Development focused discussion forum organized by the Financial and Development Supervisory Agency (BPKP) on Tuesday (28/5/2024).

Farid asserted that stalled assets can be minimized by establishing a renewable energy roadmap. Citing the IRENA study, making an energy transition roadmap with detailed renewable energy use can provide a clear picture of the steps that need to be taken by stakeholders.

“Some risk mitigation also needs to be done in the energy transition. First, mapping and analysis of risks, such as mapping policy frameworks, roadmaps, and national strategies and their impact on assets. Second, analysis and conceptualization of mitigation options, such as understanding the overall asset value. Third, identifying key enablers to overcome the risk of stalled assets,” Farid said.

According to Farid, using natural gas can be a short- to medium-term alternative to utilizing assets that have the potential to experience asset stalling. Citing IRENA data, natural gas is expected to remain in use until 2050 as much as almost 7 percent of the total energy trade commodities. This is driven by the development of carbon capture and storage technology (Carbon Capture Storage and Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage) to capture carbon emissions from either combustion in gas and steam power plants (PLTG) or blue hydrogen production, with carbon capture reaching above 95 percent.

“CCS/CCUS plays a role in utilizing natural gas and other fossil fuels. However, there are potential limitations regarding policies and regulations because they are still based on fossil fuels, and their performance must be strictly controlled. In addition, energy conservation is an important part of decarbonization efforts that needs to be adopted because it is easy to do and has minimal costs,” Farid said.

Farid assessed that energy conservation needs to be implemented at all stages of energy management, which includes upstream management aimed at conserving energy resources and downstream management aimed at improving energy efficiency. The implementation of energy conservation programs is carried out by various sectors, from energy providers, industry, transportation, and buildings, with targets based on the national energy policy (PP No. 79 of 2014), namely a one percent decrease in final energy intensity per year and a 17 percent decrease in final energy consumption from business as usual (BAU).

South Sumatra Province Energy Transition Forum: Preparing for a Just Energy Transition

press release

Palembang, 30 May 2024 – Using renewable energy is a way to reduce emissions from the energy sector. This step will prevent the rise of the earth’s temperature and minimize the impact of the future climate crisis. However, the use of fossil energy still dominates in Indonesia. For this reason, careful planning and preparation are needed to ensure that switching from fossil energy to renewable energy or energy transition runs smoothly and fairly. Not only that, the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) assesses that the trend of energy transition in various parts of the world will trigger a decrease in demand for Indonesian coal. This will impact the economy of regions whose income comes from coal, including South Sumatra.

IESR encourages the South Sumatra government to prepare for an equitable energy transition through energy transition and economic transformation. This effort is made to prevent a decrease in regional income in line with the reduction in coal demand in various parts of the world.

In collaboration with the Energy and Mineral Resources Agency (ESDM) of South Sumatra Province, IESR initiated the South Sumatra Province Energy Transition Forum (29/5/2024). The event involved representatives from 17 regencies and cities in South Sumatra, as well as universities, industry, and mass media. Through this forum, dialogue and discussion took place to unite the vision and mission facing the energy transition.

Hendriansyah, Head of the Energy and Mineral Resources Agency of South Sumatra Province, said this forum is an essential step in the province’s shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy. The agency is committed to supporting various initiatives that will reduce carbon emissions and increase the use of clean energy.

“We invite the involvement of district and city governments in welcoming the inevitable energy transition. The purpose of this activity is to prepare and anticipate the impact of the energy transition and increase the utilization of renewable energy,” he said.

Based on data from the Energy and Mineral Resources Agency of South Sumatra Province, the installed capacity of renewable energy plants in South Sumatra reached 989.12 megawatts (MW) until 2023. According to Hendriansyah, South Sumatra is able to develop and utilize renewable energy despite being the largest coal producer in Indonesia.

“The energy transition is not just about technological change, but also behavioural and mindset change. Through this forum, we hope to create mutual awareness and commitment for a greener and more sustainable future,” said Hendriansyah.

Marlistya Citraningrum, Program Manager of Sustainable Energy Access at IESR, explained that transforming a sustainable energy system and economy requires policy innovations based on data-based scientific studies.

“IESR’s presence in South Sumatra is to work strategically with various stakeholders, provide technical assistance and capacity building, and build networks with government and non-government organizations. We have also conducted several researches collaboratively with Sriwijaya University academics to assess the challenges and opportunities of economic transformation in South Sumatra and built the South Sumatra Energy Transition Journalist Network (JTE) with the Palembang Alliance of Independent Journalists (AJI) and the Society of Indonesian Environmental Journalists (SIEJ),” said Marlistya.

Marlistya also emphasized that the energy transition process must be equitable. According to her, prioritizing moral obligations in the energy transition will ensure that every individual has equal rights in this change.

“There are three principles to realize justice in the energy transition. First, justice at the local level, considering those affected by the energy transition. Second, justice from the perspective of authority is about building the participation of policymakers at different levels to create synergies and contextualized energy transition planning. Third, justice in the long term that takes into account the welfare of the community and anticipates the impact of changes in the economic structure on society,” Marlistya concluded.

Capacity Building of Industry, Academia and Government Towards Green and Sustainable Industry

To encourage wider adoption of decarbonization pillars, IESR organized a workshop and exhibition titled ‘Capacity Building for Industry, Academia and Government Towards Green and Sustainable Industry’, as a first step to equip and sharpen the capacity of key stakeholders in the industrial sector in Indonesia.

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Report Launching and Discussion : 1.5°C-aligned coal power transition pathways in Indonesia: additional strategies beyond the Comprehensive Investment and Policy Plan (CIPP)

Background

Indonesia has ratified the Paris Agreement through Law no 16/2016. As a result, Indonesia is legally bound to contribute to the global struggle to mitigate the climate crisis through ambitious efforts and action in reducing Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions and limiting the increase of the average global temperature below 1.5 0C. In one of the IPCC climate model results of a 1.5 0C compatible pathway, the global Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission must decrease by 45% in 2030 compared to 2010 and reach net zero emission by 2050. As of now, Indonesia is among the top 10 greenhouse gas (GHG) emitters and is still projected to increase its emissions, with the energy sector as the highest GHG contributor by 2030.

In November 2023, the Government of Indonesia published the first version of the Comprehensive Investment and Policy Plan (CIPP), outlining the country’s power sector emissions reduction roadmap and strategies. While the plan was expected to detail how the emissions reduction and renewable targets envisioned by the JETP will be delivered with investment and policies, we find that critical elements of a successful coal power transition are absent from the current version. 

According to the CIPP report, the investment required to achieve the 2030 targets proposed in the plan is estimated at 97 US$ billion.8 These resources will cover over 400 priority projects22, including grid development, phase-out of coal power plants, and the deployment of renewable energy. Overall, 50% of the resources are allocated for investment in dispatchable clean technologies such as geothermal and hydropower, while 26% is designated for variable renewable plants, and 20% for transmission infrastructure. The early retirement of coal plants represents just 2% of the entire plan8.

Join the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) and the Center for Global Sustainability (CGS) at the University of Maryland on (insert date) to learn about new research into achieving a successful coal power transition in Indonesia. This event will launch two new reports, followed by a discussion session to disseminate key findings and recommendations to Indonesian stakeholders.

  1. To address the gaps in investment and subsequent resources, IESR and CGS assessed existing and pipeline coal power plants to determine retirement priority using a muti-criteria framework under a 1.5 0C compatible emission pathway for Indonesia. The research develops a comprehensive, high-ambition pathway for Indonesia’s coal power transition by combining a global integrated assessment model (GCAM), a power system dispatch model (PLEXOS), and bottom-up analyses. It expands the existing version of the CIPP in several dimensions, including (1) assessing the pathway that is 1.5°C aligned through 2050, (2) covering both on-grid plants and off-grid captive plants, (3) exploring a larger set of transition options for different coal plants, and (4) conducting plant-by-plant assessments to better understand the technical and economic suitability for individual plants, using the best available data. Further analysis is done to determine the costs and benefits of the early coal retirement scenario from economic, social, and environmental aspects, for a wider set of stakeholders. 
  2. The Center for Global Sustainability’s new report and database, the first of its kind on industrial parks, which is a pivotal element of the broader CIPP initiative aimed at bolstering regional economies. This launch highlights the importance of enhanced data availability, essential for understanding demand and making informed decisions about captive coal development. It also emphasizes the need to balance environmental objectives with economic growth and explores the potential for developing renewable energy sources within industrial estates.

Objective

The objectives of these seminars and workshops are:

  1. Disseminate the IESR-UMD study on transition strategies and 1.5°C -aligned pathway for on grid and captive power plants
  2. Discuss and identify aspects to consider for Indonesia to implement its coal-to-renewables strategy.
  3. Identify and propose a holistic framework for Indonesia beyond JETP CIPP to assess its transition strategies and 1.5°C -aligned pathway

Presentation

1.5°C-aligned Coal Power Transition Pathways in Indonesia – Akbar Bagaskara & Maria A Borrero

1.5°C-aligned-coal-power-transition-pathways-in-Indonesia-Presentation

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Sustainable Industrial Development in Indonesia Challenges and Opportunities in Industrial Parks – Jiehong Lou

Sustainable-Industrial-Development-in-Indonesia-Challenges-and-Opportunities-in-Industrial-Parks

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Workshop and Capacity Building for Media Phase 1


Recording Tahap 1


Background

Indonesia, the world’s largest archipelago, is faced with two major crises: climate change and the energy crisis. The impact of climate change is increasingly felt with the increasing frequency of natural disasters, such as floods, landslides and droughts. On the other hand, the energy crisis is characterized by a high dependence on fossil fuels that are depleting and not environmentally friendly.

An energy transition towards renewable energy or clean energy is the solution to overcome both crises. Renewable energy such as solar, wind and water have great potential to meet Indonesia’s energy needs, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the impacts of climate change.

Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) and the media have an important role in encouraging the government to achieve clean energy targets in Indonesia. CSOs can act as agents of advocacy, education, and community mobilization to support clean energy. Although CSOs have an important role, there are still capacity gaps in understanding and communicating energy transition issues. Meanwhile, mass media can act as agents of education and persuasion to support clean energy. Although the mass media has an important role, there is still a capacity gap in understanding and communicating energy transition issues, especially in local mass media. This is due to the complexity of energy transition issues that require in-depth knowledge and understanding. Moreover, there are many differences of opinion and challenges on new renewable energy (NRE) as a solution for clean energy sources in the future.

To achieve the impact of CSO pressure on government policies in line with the Net Zero Emission (NZE) target in 2060 or sooner, it is important to increase CSO capacity so that advocacy and information dissemination are more targeted. To that end, IESR created a capacity building program designed to increase the capacity of CSOs in understanding and communicating energy transition issues in Indonesia.

The capacity building program is expected to benefit CSOs in improving their ability to promote energy transition through advocacy, education, and community mobilization. This capacity building program is an important step to improve the capacity of CSOs in supporting the energy transition in Indonesia. By increasing the capacity of CSOs, it is expected that the energy transition in Indonesia can be implemented more effectively and sustainably.

Prior to the capacity building program, IESR has conducted an in-depth analysis of the condition of mass media coverage in Indonesia and conducted mass media mapping. These results were used to create a capacity building concept that adapts to the needs. Needs that IESR considers important enough to be followed up will be selected as the basis for the capacity building concept.

The capacity building program will be held in two phases in 2024. In the workshop that will be held at the end of May 2024 (stage 1), climate change, the introduction of energy transition, and also the energy transition roadmap in Indonesia will be presented. Regarding climate change, it will be presented how the condition of Indonesia with current government policies will impact the NZE target. It will also explain how Indonesia’s environmental conditions and the effect of carbon emissions on climate change are occurring. The introduction to energy transition is given with material that is already structured and relevant to current conditions. The general public can access it freely and learn about the energy transition more easily. As well as the energy transition roadmap that needs joint commitment so that the NZE target can be achieved. Phase 2 will discuss more technical issues such as solar and wind power generation technologies as well as nuclear and CSS technologies. This phase will be conducted at the end of June or sooner.

About Climate Action Tracker (CAT)

The Climate Action Tracker (CAT) is an independent scientific analysis that assesses a country’s climate action and measures its conformity with the Paris Agreement to pursue efforts to limit global temperature rise to 1.5oC.

CAT is the product of a consortium of two organizations, Climate Analytics and New Climate Institute, in collaboration with several other institutions. CAT has been providing its independent analysis to policymakers since 2009.

In 2022, the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) officially joined as a collaborator in CAT. IESR provides assessments of other countries’ mitigation targets, policies and actions and reviews Climate Analytics’ assessments of Indonesia’s mitigation targets, policies and actions.

About the Energy Transition Academy

The Energy Transition Academy by transisienergi.id is a digital learning portal on energy transition. The materials provided in this program are reliable and up to date sources. Also relevant to Indonesia’s current conditions.

The Energy Transition Academy is an educational solution for students, civil society organizations, journalists to deepen their understanding of energy transformation in Indonesia and the world. In addition, the Energy Transition Academy also targets and develops skill building, so that the younger generation can contribute and be active in the energy transition process.

Objective

  1. Providing knowledge related to energy transition issues and renewable energy in Indonesia
  2. Understand the complexity of energy transition issues that occur
  3. Can identify and analyze energy transition policies
  4. Develop effective advocacy and communication strategies
  5. Build a common perception among mass media in the field of climate change or renewable energy in encouraging the energy transition
  6. Build networks and cooperation with various parties

 


Presentation

CAT Indonesia Assessment – Delima Ramadhani

1.-CAT-Indonesia-Assessment-Media-Delima-Ramadhani

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Introduction to Energy Transition- Abraham Octama

2.-Pengenalan-Transisi-Energi-Abraham-Octama

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Indonesia Energy Transition Roadmap – Raditya Wiranegara

3.-Peta-Jalan-Transisi-Energi-Indonesia-Raditya-Wiranegara

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Workshop and Capacity Building for Civil Society Organizations (CSO) Phase 1


Recording Tahap 1


Background

Indonesia, the world’s largest archipelago, is faced with two major crises: climate change and the energy crisis. The impact of climate change is increasingly felt with the increasing frequency of natural disasters, such as floods, landslides and droughts. On the other hand, the energy crisis is characterized by a high dependence on fossil fuels that are depleting and not environmentally friendly.

An energy transition towards renewable energy or clean energy is the solution to overcome both crises. Renewable energy such as solar, wind and water have great potential to meet Indonesia’s energy needs, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the impacts of climate change.

Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) and the media have an important role in encouraging the government to achieve clean energy targets in Indonesia. CSOs can act as agents of advocacy, education, and community mobilization to support clean energy. Although CSOs have an important role, there are still capacity gaps in understanding and communicating energy transition issues. Meanwhile, mass media can act as agents of education and persuasion to support clean energy. Although the mass media has an important role, there is still a capacity gap in understanding and communicating energy transition issues, especially in local mass media. This is due to the complexity of energy transition issues that require in-depth knowledge and understanding. Moreover, there are many differences of opinion and challenges on new renewable energy (NRE) as a solution for clean energy sources in the future.

To achieve the impact of CSO pressure on government policies in line with the Net Zero Emission (NZE) target in 2060 or sooner, it is important to increase CSO capacity so that advocacy and information dissemination are more targeted. To that end, IESR created a capacity building program designed to increase the capacity of CSOs in understanding and communicating energy transition issues in Indonesia.

The capacity building program is expected to benefit CSOs in improving their ability to promote energy transition through advocacy, education, and community mobilization. This capacity building program is an important step to improve the capacity of CSOs in supporting the energy transition in Indonesia. By increasing the capacity of CSOs, it is expected that the energy transition in Indonesia can be implemented more effectively and sustainably.

Prior to the capacity building program, IESR has conducted an in-depth analysis of the condition of mass media coverage in Indonesia and conducted mass media mapping. These results were used to create a capacity building concept that adapts to the needs. Needs that IESR considers important enough to be followed up will be selected as the basis for the capacity building concept.

The capacity building program will be held in two phases in 2024. In the workshop that will be held at the end of May 2024 (stage 1), climate change, the introduction of energy transition, and also the energy transition roadmap in Indonesia will be presented. Regarding climate change, it will be presented how the condition of Indonesia with current government policies will impact the NZE target. It will also explain how Indonesia’s environmental conditions and the effect of carbon emissions on climate change are occurring. The introduction to energy transition is given with material that is already structured and relevant to current conditions. The general public can access it freely and learn about the energy transition more easily. As well as the energy transition roadmap that needs joint commitment so that the NZE target can be achieved. Phase 2 will discuss more technical issues such as solar and wind power generation technologies as well as nuclear and CSS technologies. This phase will be conducted at the end of June or sooner.

About Climate Action Tracker (CAT)

The Climate Action Tracker (CAT) is an independent scientific analysis that assesses a country’s climate action and measures its conformity with the Paris Agreement to pursue efforts to limit global temperature rise to 1.5oC.

CAT is the product of a consortium of two organizations, Climate Analytics and New Climate Institute, in collaboration with several other institutions. CAT has been providing its independent analysis to policymakers since 2009.

In 2022, the Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) officially joined as a collaborator in CAT. IESR provides assessments of other countries’ mitigation targets, policies and actions and reviews Climate Analytics’ assessments of Indonesia’s mitigation targets, policies and actions.

About the Energy Transition Academy

The Energy Transition Academy by transisienergi.id is a digital learning portal on energy transition. The materials provided in this program are reliable and up to date sources. Also relevant to Indonesia’s current conditions.

The Energy Transition Academy is an educational solution for students, civil society organizations, journalists to deepen their understanding of energy transformation in Indonesia and the world. In addition, the Energy Transition Academy also targets and develops skill building, so that the younger generation can contribute and be active in the energy transition process.

Objective

  1. Providing knowledge related to energy transition issues and renewable energy in Indonesia
  2. Understand the complexity of energy transition issues that occur
  3. Can identify and analyze energy transition policies
  4. Develop effective advocacy and communication strategies
  5. Build a common perception among mass media in the field of climate change or renewable energy in encouraging the energy transition
  6. Build networks and cooperation with various parties

 


Presentation

CAT Indonesia Assessment – Shahnaz Nur Firdausi

4.-CSO-Indonesia-Assessment-CSO-Shahnaz

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Introduction to Energy Transition- Abraham Octama

2.-Pengenalan-Transisi-Energi-Abraham-Octama

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Indonesia Energy Transition Roadmap – Raditya Wiranegara

3.-Peta-Jalan-Transisi-Energi-Indonesia-Raditya-Wiranegara

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Carefully Designing Indonesia’s Energy Policy Framework

Jakarta, March 28, 2024 – The National Energy Council (DEN) plans to adjust the renewable energy mix target. Currently in the draft Government Regulation on National Energy Policy (RPP KEN), DEN plans to reduce the national renewable energy mix target to 17-19 percent by 2025. Previously, the renewable energy mix target was 23 percent by 2025.

The Institute for Essential Services Reform (IESR) considers this a step back from the Indonesian government’s commitment to overseeing the energy transition.

Raditya Wiranegara, IESR Research Manager, in a hearing with the National Energy Board expressed his concern behind the setting of the renewable energy mix target.

“IESR has previously conducted modeling that has been published in our annual report, Indonesia Energy Transition Outlook (IETO). Our modeling results show differences with the modeling results that form the basis for the formulation of the KEN RPP. This is especially evident in the final energy growth, where in the modeling for IETO we used Bappenas’ GDP growth assumption for Indonesia Emas 2045,” Radit said.

This was clarified by Retno Gumilang Dewi, ITB’s modeling team, who assisted DEN in the modeling, that the figures currently circulating are adjusted figures.

“The model we produced can be said to be an ideal model. The modeling was then brought for FGD (focused group discussion) and received various inputs, so it was adjusted,” said Retno Gumilang.

Fabby Tumiwa, Executive Director of IESR on the same occasion said that in preparing a country’s energy planning, it is important to ensure the choice of technology that is most relevant and tested with the latest technological developments.

“This step is important and crucial to avoid being locked-in by high-carbon technologies,” Fabby said.

Fabby added that if we are already trapped in the choice of high-carbon technology, it will require even greater investment to get out of the high-carbon technology. IESR also encourages the achievement of renewable energy targets that have been set in the RUPTL and national strategic projects as a driver of the growth of the domestic renewable energy industry.

Road to Youth Climate Conference Webinar: Climate Change, Industry and Lifestyle


Tayangan Tunda


Background

The impacts of climate change have become a serious threat to the lives of children and youth. A study conducted by Save the Children in 2020 found that children born in 2020 experienced disasters 3.4 times more frequently than their grandparents born in 1960. The disasters involved climate change, such as heatwaves, droughts, forest fires, floods, and crop failures, putting additional pressure on the environment necessary for children’s growth and protection. Another study conducted by UNICEF highlighted that climate change is the biggest threat to children’s health, nutrition, education, and future.

On the other hand, the development of the industrial sector in recent decades has changed people’s lifestyles in many ways. From electronic goods to daily clothing. Unfortunately, environmentally unsound production and consumption activities often have adverse impacts on climate change. For example, the overuse of natural resources, deforestation due to industrial activities, and the development of fast fashion trends that encourage unsustainable consumption. In fact, the industrial sector alone accounts for 25% of global carbon emissions (UNEP, 2023). Therefore, it is necessary to make changes in mindset and daily behavior, especially for the younger generation, to reduce and mitigate the impact of climate change on the industrial sector and lifestyle.

This webinar aims to dig deeper into how climate change is caused by industry and the lifestyles of the general public, including those of young people. Through in-depth discussions, a better understanding of the challenges and opportunities faced by young people in the context of climate change is expected. In addition, this webinar is also geared towards formulating solutions and concrete actions that can be taken by young people in building sustainable lifestyles and formulating innovations in industry to reduce negative impacts on the environment.

Objective

  • Discuss the impact of climate change on the industrial and lifestyle sectors.
  • Discuss the role of young people in mitigating the impacts of climate change on their lifestyle.

Presentasi

 

Peran Anak Muda dalam Mendorong Arah Perkembangan Industri Indonesia yang Berkelanjutan – Faricha Hidayati

Peran-Anak-Muda-dalam-Mendorong-Arah-Perkembangan-Industri-Indonesia-yang-Berkelanjutan-Faricha-Hidayati

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